Social Dealings – Grover Chamber http://groverchamber.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 04:16:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://groverchamber.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Social Dealings – Grover Chamber http://groverchamber.com/ 32 32 A new board will take a closer look at citizens’ experience with Bennington Police https://groverchamber.com/a-new-board-will-take-a-closer-look-at-citizens-experience-with-bennington-police/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 23:52:28 +0000 https://groverchamber.com/a-new-board-will-take-a-closer-look-at-citizens-experience-with-bennington-police/ Members of the Bennington Community Policing Review Advisory Board held their second formal meeting on Thursday, November 17 at the Bennington Fire Station. Screenshot The Bennington Community Policing Review Advisory Board has kicked off, laying out initial plans to learn more about residents’ experiences with city policing. The six-member council of civilians on Thursday formed […]]]>
Members of the Bennington Community Policing Review Advisory Board held their second formal meeting on Thursday, November 17 at the Bennington Fire Station. Screenshot

The Bennington Community Policing Review Advisory Board has kicked off, laying out initial plans to learn more about residents’ experiences with city policing.

The six-member council of civilians on Thursday formed an internal committee for community outreach. It aims to gather information about residents’ interactions with the Bennington Police Department, with some reporting adverse experiences with the agency.

Board member Robert Ebert suggested seeking advice from local social service organizations, such as a counseling centre, the coalition for the homeless and the region’s largest food pantry. , on their client’s relationship with the police. He would like to confirm or refute the findings of a 2019 International Association of Chiefs of Police survey, where more than a third of respondents expressed distrust of the Bennington Police Department.

“If we validate this data and find out that there is the situation here, then maybe we can think of ways to improve,” Ebert said.

The police review advisory board is part of an ongoing effort to reform the Bennington Police Department, which began after the agency came under fire for mishandling the state representative’s harassment. era, Kiah Morris, the second black woman to serve in the Vermont Legislative Assembly.

The Bennington City Government engaged the International Association of Chiefs of Police in 2019 to conduct a comprehensive review of the police department’s policies and community relations. Among the association’s findings was that the officers portrayed a “warrior mentality”, which caused mistrust within some segments of the community.

The association made several recommendations, including that Bennington consider establishing a community advisory council to build residents’ confidence in the city police.

The Community Policing Review Advisory Board was created in April, but without the oversight powers the city’s selection committee had originally envisioned. The Review Advisory Committee held its first formal meeting last month, where members debated whether they wanted Bennington Police to attend their meetings.

At her Thursday meeting, council chairwoman Kelly Carroll clarified that the city’s resolution establishing the group was for Police Chief Paul Doucette or his designate to attend all council meetings. Bennington selection committee member Tom Hailey would serve as liaison with the selection committee.

During meetings of the review advisory committee, the police representative may speak at the public consultation and answer questions from committee members. But Bennington Police should request a place on the meeting agenda if they wish to present a report or give a longer speech.

A motion to automatically include the police at monthly council meetings failed, with three votes against, one vote in favor and two abstentions.

“I’m really wary of having too much police presence at our regular meetings,” Ebert said ahead of the vote. “They are here as a resource for us.”

Meanwhile, Bennington Selection Committee Chair Jeannie Jenkins said city officials still want the review advisory committee to have oversight powers when complaints are filed against Bennington police. Currently, according to the city attorney, Vermont law only allows the chief of police, city manager and selection committee members to perform this role.

Until state law changes—or Bennington amends its municipal charter—civilian oversight of the Bennington Police Department’s internal investigations rests with the Selection Committee.

“We are always looking for ways to provide expanded access” to review advisory board members, Jenkins said in an interview. “At this point, I think we’re in a slight waiting pattern until we know what’s possible.”

She said the city has asked state lawmakers for help and is waiting for the next legislative session to begin in January.

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Dorset Police release data on Springbourne drug trafficking reports https://groverchamber.com/dorset-police-release-data-on-springbourne-drug-trafficking-reports/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 05:05:59 +0000 https://groverchamber.com/dorset-police-release-data-on-springbourne-drug-trafficking-reports/ DORSET Police have released data on the number of reports of drug dealing in Springbourne and East Cliff over the past five years. This follows claims by a resident that he regularly sees drug dealing outside his home in Springbourne. READ MORE: Residents ‘terrified’ by drug dealing in Springbourne A Dorset Police spokesman said: “The […]]]>

DORSET Police have released data on the number of reports of drug dealing in Springbourne and East Cliff over the past five years.

This follows claims by a resident that he regularly sees drug dealing outside his home in Springbourne.

READ MORE: Residents ‘terrified’ by drug dealing in Springbourne

A Dorset Police spokesman said: “The data shows the number of reports recorded by Dorset Police relating to drug supply offenses in the Springbourne and East Cliff area over the past five years, which we believe does not indicate a significant increase.”

Data

  • 2017 – 19
  • 2018 – 19
  • 2019 – 15
  • 2020 – 20
  • 2021 – 14
  • 2022 (1/01/22 to 10/31/22) – 13

Chief Inspector Darren Harris, of Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole Local Policing Area (LPA), said: ‘We are fully aware of the impact of drug trafficking and drug-related offenses on residents and associated anti-social behavior, and we are committed to working with our partners to address these issues.

“While we appreciate that statistics alone do not paint the whole picture, it should be noted that our figures show that there has not been a significant increase in reports related to drug trafficking in the region of Springbourne over the past five years.

“Local Neighborhood Policing Team officers continue to carry out intelligence-led patrols in the Springbourne area, with information reported by community members helping us to direct our resources to where they are most needed. and so we encourage people to report any issues. ours.”

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UPDATE 1-Republicans set to win US House majority in midterm elections https://groverchamber.com/update-1-republicans-set-to-win-us-house-majority-in-midterm-elections/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 20:16:07 +0000 https://groverchamber.com/update-1-republicans-set-to-win-us-house-majority-in-midterm-elections/ (Adds McCarthy wins Republican leadership vote, another race called) By Richard Cowan WASHINGTON, Nov 15 (Reuters) – Republicans edged closer to majority control of the U.S. House of Representatives on Tuesday, a midterm victory tempered by the surprisingly narrow margin they hold over Democrats as they inaugurate two years of divided government. Republicans have so […]]]>

(Adds McCarthy wins Republican leadership vote, another race called)

By Richard Cowan

WASHINGTON, Nov 15 (Reuters) – Republicans edged closer to majority control of the U.S. House of Representatives on Tuesday, a midterm victory tempered by the surprisingly narrow margin they hold over Democrats as they inaugurate two years of divided government.

Republicans have so far won 216 seats in the 435-member chamber, according to Edison Research projections, of which 218 are needed for a majority. Calls for close races in states like California and Colorado later on Tuesday would likely see Republicans wrest control of the House from Speaker Joe Biden’s Democrats, who trail with 206 seats.

The news could coincide with a 9 p.m. ET (0200 GMT Wednesday) speech by former President Donald Trump from his home in Florida, where he is expected to announce his 2024 presidential bid even as his Republican Party shows early signs of Trump fatigue.

The Republicans’ expected House victory will fall far short of the “red wave” they predicted for the Nov. 8 midterm elections, and some party members blamed Trump for the disappointing performance.

Democrats retained control of the U.S. Senate after retaining seats in the swing states of Arizona and Nevada, and could win an outright majority if Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock defeats Republican challenger Herschel Walker in a runoff in Georgia on December 6.

A divided Congress next year will mean Biden will have a much harder time pushing his agenda — from expanding national social programs and raising taxes on the wealthy and corporations to aiding Ukraine. in his battle against Russia.

Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy, in a closed caucus vote, resisted a challenge from hardline conservative Rep. Andy Biggs and will be the party’s nominee for House Speaker, if Republicans win the majority.

As Speaker of the House, McCarthy would be the second successor to the presidency after the vice president when Congress convenes in January.

The President, elected by the House as a whole, sets the legislative agenda for the heavy house and the political tone of the ruling party. If successful in her bid for president, McCarthy would succeed Democrat Nancy Pelosi.

In retaliation for two impeachment efforts by Democrats against Trump, House conservatives are already preparing to investigate Biden administration officials and President Hunter’s son’s past business dealings with China and other countries — and even Biden himself.

They have publicly talked about seeking cost savings in the Social Security and Medicare safety net programs, and making permanent tax cuts enacted in 2017 that are set to expire.

But much of their agenda could be scuttled by the Senate, where Democrats retained their majority, as well as Biden’s veto power over legislation.

Midterm ballots from Nov. 8 are still being counted in races across the country a week after the vote. Late Monday, Democrat Katie Hobbs was tipped as the winner of Arizona’s hotly contested gubernatorial contest, beating Kari Lake, one of the most high-profile Republican candidates to embrace the bogus voter fraud allegations of Trump in 2020.

Lake hasn’t given in yet. After the race call, she tweeted, “Arizonans know BS when they see him.”

(Reporting by Richard Cowan Editing by Colleen Jenkins and Alistair Bell)

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Author Brad Meltzer meets the kids of Ogden and touts the power of books | News, Sports, Jobs https://groverchamber.com/author-brad-meltzer-meets-the-kids-of-ogden-and-touts-the-power-of-books-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 22:41:15 +0000 https://groverchamber.com/author-brad-meltzer-meets-the-kids-of-ogden-and-touts-the-power-of-books-news-sports-jobs/ 1 / 3 Author Brad Meltzer speaks to a group of fifth and sixth graders from Ogden at Ogden High School on Friday, November 11, 2022. Meltzer was the guest speaker at the Authors Fall Event of the Ogden School Foundation this year and also met with students. Tim Vandenack, Standard Examiner 2 […]]]>

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Author Brad Meltzer speaks to a group of fifth and sixth graders from Ogden at Ogden High School on Friday, November 11, 2022. Meltzer was the guest speaker at the Authors Fall Event of the Ogden School Foundation this year and also met with students.

Tim Vandenack, Standard Examiner

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Author Brad Meltzer signs a book for Polk Elementary student Spencer Peterson after speaking with a group of fifth and sixth graders from Ogden at Ogden High School on Friday, November 11, 2022. Meltzer was the guest speaker at the Ogden School Foundation’s Fall Author Event this year and also met with students.

Tim Vandenack, Standard Examiner

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Author Brad Meltzer signs a book for a pupil after speaking with a group of fifth and sixth graders from Ogden at Ogden Secondary School on Friday November 11, 2022. Meltzer was the guest speaker at the Ogden School Foundation fall author event this year and also met with students.

Tim Vandenack, Standard Examiner

❮ ❯















OGDEN — Author Brad Meltzer, unsurprisingly, believes in the power of books and stories to help children open up to the possibilities that await them.

“They show your potential and our children need to fulfill their own potential,” he said, contrasting with social media. “So much on social media shows you your limits. Isn’t it time to show kids their potential? »

It can be difficult trying to counter the power of social media, full of negativity, but Meltzer – the guest speaker at the Ogden School Foundation’s fall event this year – says “you need to meet the kids where they find themselves”. In other words, parents need to find reading material according to their children’s interests, whether it’s sports, animals, art or otherwise.

“When you find what kids like and show them other people who like the same things, just walk away,” he said.

Meltzer, based in Florida, is the author of thrillers, non-fiction, comics, children’s books and more. He spoke at the fall author event on Thursday and on Friday he met with fifth and sixth graders from across the Ogden School District at Ogden High School. He regularly speaks across the country in schools and with student groups. During his travels, he said, he was struck by “how much our children have in common, wherever they are.”

Earlier, he spoke with the Standard-Examiner about the importance of reading, how to get kids interested in reading and more.

He doesn’t see any particular genre as more appealing than another to kids, teens, or others. It’s about the characters – the characters in the books who give readers a window into their own lives.

“It’s funny, everyone always wants to say there’s a certain genre that’s working right now, but in every genre all the kids react to is seeing each other,” he said. . “What kids see in all of these stories is that they see themselves and what it’s like when it feels like the world is against you.”

His general advice to children is to research what interests them. He had a teacher when he was a child who developed his interest in writing and the impact lasted.

“What I would say to all kids is the same advice my teacher gave me, which is to find what you love to do. And when you find that passion, you’ll find that just becomes something that really makes you unstoppable,” he said.

As for his own writing, Meltzer’s interests run the gamut – thrillers focusing on power and the political system, Batman comics, biographies of famous people for children and more. “I write what I like. I love hero stories. I like stories that are mysteries. I love stories that actually happened,” he said.

When it comes to inspiration for writing, he says the process can be cathartic. “I’m the one working on the things that I personally take care of. I think it’s me dealing with the fears I have and the questions I have,” he said.

Still, writing isn’t always glamorous, he told the small group of students he met on Friday before addressing a larger group in the auditorium at Ogden High School. ” It’s a work. People think it’s magic. It’s not. It’s work,” he said.



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Tinubu finally reacts to US documents on allegations of drug trafficking and money laundering https://groverchamber.com/tinubu-finally-reacts-to-us-documents-on-allegations-of-drug-trafficking-and-money-laundering/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 04:36:32 +0000 https://groverchamber.com/tinubu-finally-reacts-to-us-documents-on-allegations-of-drug-trafficking-and-money-laundering/ APC presidential candidate Asiwaju Bola Ahmed Tinubu has reacted to documents alleging his involvement in drug trafficking and money laundering in the United States Some documents purporting to be “certified copies” surfaced on Tuesday, November 8, alleging that Tinubu was linked to a drug business and was to confiscate $460,000 from US authorities. Tinubu, however, […]]]>
  • APC presidential candidate Asiwaju Bola Ahmed Tinubu has reacted to documents alleging his involvement in drug trafficking and money laundering in the United States
  • Some documents purporting to be “certified copies” surfaced on Tuesday, November 8, alleging that Tinubu was linked to a drug business and was to confiscate $460,000 from US authorities.
  • Tinubu, however, responded through his campaign’s director of media and publicity, Bayo Onanuga, and told his own side of the story.

FCT, Abuja- Asiwaju Bola Ahmed Tinubu, the All Progressives Congress (APC) presidential candidate, has reacted to trending documents linking him to drug trafficking and money laundering in the United States.

On Tuesday, November 8, some documents that allegedly indicted Tinubu for drug trafficking and money laundering in the United States resurfaced on social media.

Read also

Bola Tinubu has not been charged or convicted of drug trafficking, according to Fani-Kayode

Tinubu/Alleged drug cases/United States
APC presidential candidate Bola Tinubu has rejected trending documents linking him to drug trafficking and money laundering in the United States. Photo credit: Asiwaju Bola Ahmed Tinubu
Source: Facebook

Some claim that the documents were released by the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois.

The documents say Tinubu faced narcotics charges in the United States and lost up to $460,000 to US authorities in 1993.

New allegation of involvement in the drug trade dead as a dodo, Tinubu reacts

On Tuesday night, Tinubu responded to the resurfacing trend allegation through his campaign’s director of media and publicity, Bayo Onanuga.

He said the new allegation of his involvement in the drug trade was “dead as a dodo”, adding that the “carcass of the drug allegation in America” ​​was “buried in 1993”.

Onanuga said the attempt to bring the allegation back failed in 2023 and again in 2022, when “opponents thought it was lethal enough for the APC to disqualify Tinubu from the race”.

Read also

2023: Will Tinubu quit the presidential race over drug allegations? Peter Obi’s campaign team speaks out

“It failed spectacularly and Tinubu won the primary with a landslide.

“The muckrakers are back with the same story, disguised as a ‘certified copy’ of the US court,” the statement on the Tinubu/Shettima campaign website said.

Drug trafficking allegation, ‘same old story’, says Onanuga

The statement states that Onanuga had read the new document and dismissed it as the same old tale.

“It’s as dead as a dodo,” Onanuga reportedly said, also referring to a section of the campaign’s FAQ manual that addressed the allegation.

In detail: Tinubu campaign’s reaction to drug trafficking allegations

Read the official reaction to the allegation from Tinubu-Shettima’s presidential campaign below: FAQ:

“One of the unconscionable and vicious lies peddled by political opponents about Bola Ahmed Tinubu was to portray him wrongly as a drug lord.

“The charge arose out of an investigation by FBI Agent Kevin Moss of the Tinubu and Compass Investment and Finance accounts at First Heritage Bank and Citi-Bank in the United States.

Read also

Presidency 2023: APC speaks out on the true position of the United States regarding Tinubu’s drug trafficking allegation

“On January 10, 1992, Mr. Kevin Moss sought and obtained a court order to freeze the accounts.

“On January 13, 1992, Mr. Moss telephoned Tinubu in Nigeria to substantiate the amounts in the accounts, which amounted to $1.4 million. Some of the money was allegedly deposited by two Nigerians, making the under investigation for drug-related offences.

“After the phone conversation, Tinubu instructed his lawyer in the United States to file a lawsuit against the order freezing his accounts.

“This dragged on until September 15, 1993, when an agreement was reached for an out-of-court settlement. Judge John A Nordberg of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois read the agreement reached by both parties Part of the funds, $460,000 was seized by the government.

“The FBI has never charged Tinubu with a drug offense; the case has not gone to trial. Tinubu has never been convicted. And he has never been barred from entering the United States- United.

Read also

Election 2023: 3 cases which justify that Tinubu does not attend any presidential debate

“In 2003, ten years later, when opponents of the PDP wanted to use the closed allegation to disqualify Tinubu from running for a second term in Lagos, the Inspector General of Police, Tafa Balogun, made an inquiry to the US consulate on Tinubu’s status.

“The Consulate issued a clean bill to Tinubu in a response from Legal Attaché, Michael H. Bonner.

“The letter said:

“Our heartfelt greetings to you and all law enforcement personnel of the Nigerian Police, whose continued assistance is much appreciated. With regard to your letter of February 3, 2003, reference number SR. 3000 /IGPSEC/ABJ/VOL.24/287, regarding Governor Bola Ahmed Tinubu, a federal government records check

The National Crime Information Center (NCIC) of the Bureau of Investigation (FBI) was conducted.

“The results of the checks were negative for any criminal arrest file, request or warrant for Bola Ahmed Tinubu (DDN March 29, 1952). For your department’s information, the NCIC is a highly centralized information center that maintains records of every criminal arrest and conviction in the United States and its territories.

Read also

Presidential debates: You can run but not hide, Atiku’s assistant tackles Tinubu

Nearly thirty years after the allegation was dismissed and the case declared dead, Tinubu’s opponents continue to awaken his corpse, in futile efforts to slander him.”

Tinubu meets IBB as ex-military leader asks Jagaban crucial question about his strength

In another report, Tinubu met on Tuesday 8 November with a former military head of state, Ibrahim Babangida.

The former Governor of Lagos State met Babangida at his hilltop residence in Minna, the capital of Niger State.

During the meeting, Babangida asked Tinubu if his team allowed him to have enough rest needed at his age.

Source: Legit.ng

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Navigating the North West Social Scene https://groverchamber.com/navigating-the-north-west-social-scene/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 08:11:55 +0000 https://groverchamber.com/navigating-the-north-west-social-scene/ ” Podcast (digital newspapers): Play in a new window | To download Subscribe: Spotify | “I feel like if you just start the conversation, good things will happen,” Medill freshman Zoe Alter said of making friends in college. Listen to Episode 6 of the Digital Diaries to find out how two college students navigate Northwestern’s […]]]>

“I feel like if you just start the conversation, good things will happen,” Medill freshman Zoe Alter said of making friends in college. Listen to Episode 6 of the Digital Diaries to find out how two college students navigate Northwestern’s social scene.

[music]

ERICA SCHMITT: From The Daily Northwestern, I’m Erica Schmitt and this is episode six of the Digital Diaries, a weekly podcast tracking what students are doing and asking two students a question about life at Northwestern.

ERICA SCHMITT: Many Northwestern students say it’s a “work hard, play hard” environment with the quarterback system. But with school work getting more and more intense each week, it can sometimes be difficult to maintain a social life. In addition to classes and clubs, students typically don’t have time to catch the “L” all the way to Chicago for fun, check out the school’s Division 1 athletics at events sports or even to have a coffee with a friend.

[scribble noise]

ERICA SCHMITT: This week’s question is: What is your experience with the social scene on campus?

ERICA SCHMITT: Weinberg’s sophomore, Sophia Huang, said she made friends through many school-related activities, such as her classes, clubs, and peer counselor group.

Sophie Huang: It’s a bit club-based, which makes sense, as you meet a lot of people through clubs. I feel like the social scene is kind of determined by fraternities and different clubs like cultural clubs.

ERICA SCHMITT: Huang said that in the past, the heavy workload made it difficult to balance school and socializing.

Sophie Huang: It was like the most work I had I guess. So being able to balance social friends and trying to do well in school was pretty tough for me. But I feel like I’m trying and getting to the point where I get a good balance.

ERICA SCHMITT: Over time, she also learned to nurture friendships in addition to her commitments.

Sophie Huang: For some of my friends, I see them a little bit every day or every week because, you know, we’re in the same club or we’re in the same classes. For other friends that I don’t see as often, I feel like I keep in touch just by going out to dinner once in a while. I know sometimes people are busy, so it’s nice to be able to sit down and eat and catch up on each other’s lives.

[scribble noise]

ERICA SCHMITT: Since arriving in September, Medill freshman Zoe Alter has had a positive experience making friends. Alter automatically clicked with someone in his PA group during Wildcat Welcome.

ZOE ALTER: I had met the girl from my PA group – I didn’t know she was in my PA group at the time, but I had met her at accepted student day, so we had become friends at that that time. And then we didn’t really talk until our PA group. But then we saw each other, we were like, “Oh my god, we know each other.”

ZOE ALTER: And that was really helpful because I know a lot of people who couldn’t make friends on the first day. My roommate knew someone who liked it, and then I became friends with him, so I had those two friends solidified pretty early on, which helped a lot.

ERICA SCHMITT: And from there, the group of friends expanded, with Alter making even more friends through these two.

ZOE ALTER: I think my experience of making friends was pretty good, because I didn’t really feel like I had no friends at any time. But I’m also a very sociable person, so I always try to make friends. So I think that affected him as well.

ERICA SCHMITT: Alter said that so far the social scene at Northwestern has been surprising and has exceeded his expectations.

ZOE ALTER: I have a lot more time to hang out with people than I thought. Like I thought I was going to study every night and work hard, but I can like going out at night with friends or going to their dorms and seeing them. I think in terms of the social scene, I was sure I was going to have a few days where I was going to be so lonely and sad and everything. In fact, I was impressed with what it is. But I’ve also heard that everyone I’ve met who goes here is like “everyone is so nice”. So I think I expected everyone to be nice and it worked and it has worked so far.

[music]

ERICA SCHMITT: Do you have any advice for students on campus?

Sophie Huang: I guess one piece of advice I would have for incoming freshmen is to not get lost in your work because I think Northwestern is a very academically rigorous school, and you get busy very easily and very often, so I think it’s important to do your best to maintain the links. When you first come to school, it can be a bit difficult to like the transition. It’s good to stick with it and try to reach out to the different people you meet.

ERICA SCHMITT: Alter recommends taking a risk and talking to new people.

ZOE ALTER: What I’ve always done is find people who have common interests. So people who like you notice in your class – who talk about the same things you talk about or who you just like the way they dress or whatever – simple things like that. I feel like just going up to someone and starting a conversation is really good because it’s not like someone is going to come up and be rude to you. Everyone just wants to talk to someone. And some people are just too scared to talk to anyone. So I feel like if you just start the conversation good things will happen. Whereas if you never talk, you just have to rely on people to talk to you, and it’s not as consistent.

[music]

ERICA SCHMITT: From the Daily Northwestern, I’m Erica Schmitt. Thank you for listening to episode five of The Daily’s Digital Diaries. This episode was reported and produced by me. The Daily Northwestern’s audio editor is Lawrence Price, the digital editor is Angeli Mittal, and the editor is Jacob Fulton. Be sure to subscribe to The Daily Northwestern podcasts on Spotify, Apple Podcasts or SoundCloud to hear next week’s episode on Monday.

E-mail: [email protected]
Twitter: @eschmitt318

RELATED STORIES:
— Digital Diaries Episode 1: Adjusting to the Northwest
— Digital Diaries Episode 3: Coping with Rejection
— Digital Diaries Episode 4: Surviving the Midterm

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Here’s how a GOP win in November could affect 2023 defense policy https://groverchamber.com/heres-how-a-gop-win-in-november-could-affect-2023-defense-policy/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 10:02:22 +0000 https://groverchamber.com/heres-how-a-gop-win-in-november-could-affect-2023-defense-policy/ Bigger defense budgets, greater scrutiny of military aid to Ukraine and a tougher line on China are all on the horizon if Republicans take control of the House or Senate. after the midterm elections, experts say. While not at the forefront of the 2022 midterm elections, foreign policy and national security issues are likely to […]]]>

Bigger defense budgets, greater scrutiny of military aid to Ukraine and a tougher line on China are all on the horizon if Republicans take control of the House or Senate. after the midterm elections, experts say.

While not at the forefront of the 2022 midterm elections, foreign policy and national security issues are likely to be upended with a GOP takeover of one or both chambers, with impacts large-scale that could happen soon after November 8th.

Pundits already have their eyes set on a range of defense topics — both global and domestic — that are set to change under a new Congress, from spending levels to social policies and everything in between, Arnold Punaro, a retired three-star general and former staff director for the Senate Armed Services Committee, told The Hill.

“How to dissuade China, especially vis-à-vis Taiwan? . . . How much should we really invest in the fight against climate change in terms of national security? Vaccine mandate, recruitment challenges; these are all things they are going to ask,” he said.

The GOP’s top defense priorities were first highlighted in House Republicans’ “Pledge to America,” released in September, which outlined their goals if they return to a majority.

The lawmakers promise to “support our troops, invest in an effective and efficient military, establish a select committee on China, and exert peace by force with our allies to counter growing global threats.”

Republican leaders did not give specific details on how they would achieve those goals, but they are expected to drive many of their needs for an increase in the defense budget, with the defense appropriations bill expected to rise. in fiscal year 2024 if Republicans take more control, according to Punaro.

While the defense budget for fiscal year 2023 is still being worked out between the House and the Senate, lawmakers are expected to agree to an $815 billion defense budget, about 9% more than last year’s expenses.

Higher inflation costs drove much of that increase, but Republicans are expected to ask for even more money next year, following past examples of a Republican-controlled House and Senate. , said Punaro.

Keeping an eye on Congressional spending, one of the most watched changes will be foreign aid — particularly to Ukraine in its ongoing war with Russia — with a split on the issue among a small number of populist members of the House GOP and those of the establishment. to party.

The United States has provided Ukraine nearly $20 billion in lethal aid since the war began in February, but Kyiv stressed that more will be needed for defense as well as humanitarian efforts as Russia continues to damage critical Ukrainian infrastructure.

As Kyiv leaders believe a GOP-led House or Senate won’t give up on arming Ukraine, they are bracing for a scenario where Republicans may seek to cut future economic aid to their country,” said Daniel Vajdich, a lobbyist who works with Ukraine. officials.

“Ukraine is not worried, but there is recognition in Kyiv that the nature of the conversation may change in the weeks and months to come,” Vajdich told The Hill.

He added that Ukrainians are “constantly engaging with Congress” and “are confident that the vast majority of lawmakers understand what is at stake and what a Russian victory would mean, not just for Ukraine, but for the states.” United themselves”.

The issue of foreign military aid in Congress next year was highlighted after House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, potentially the next House Speaker, said in October that he would not there would be no ‘blank check’ for Ukraine if the Republicans took control.

“People are going to be sitting in a recession, and they’re not going to write Ukraine a blank check,” McCarthy told Punchbowl News. “Ukraine is important, but at the same time it can’t be the only thing they do, and it can’t be a blank check.”

McCarthy has since tried to downplay the statement, saying he thought the aid to Ukraine was important and was only arguing for more oversight.

“I am in favor of making sure we move forward to defeat Russia on this program. But there should be no blank checks on anything. We have $31 trillion in debt,” McCarthy said on CNBC last month.

Punaro also did not believe Republican leadership would allow a rollback of monetary aid to Ukraine, pointing to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), who has vowed that a Senate led by the GOP would go beyond what the Biden administration has provided and “focus its oversight on the timely delivery of needed weapons and greater allied assistance to Ukraine.”

“You have the isolationist wings of both parties stirring the pot. . . .[but] I think the leaders will be able to convince the American people and convince a majority in Congress that the risk of Russia and Putin taking over Ukraine is much greater than the other way around,” Punaro said.

And asked about the effect a GOP house could have on aid to Ukraine, Pentagon Press Secretary Brig. Gen. Pat Ryder said the administration had “excellent bipartisan support to date as it relates to Ukraine, and therefore the department will continue to work closely with Congress on this important issue.”

Republican lawmakers are also expected to push on several social issues, particularly the Pentagon’s mandate on the 2021 COVID-19 vaccine, access to abortion, numerous defense policy changes regarding diversity, gender, inclusion and the investigation of extremism in the ranks.

These issues have prompted several heated exchanges between conservative lawmakers and Pentagon officials when debated in defense policy hearings over the past year. Most notable of these was a tense back-and-forth in April between Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin and Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) over allegations that the military is pushing for a wake-up call. and socialism.

Punaro said he expects those conversations to continue into 2023 if Republicans gain full or partial control of Congress, but GOP lawmakers, while challenging several policies, are unlikely to be successful. not change them significantly.

“I think, to their credit, defense committees put national security ahead of partisan politics, and I think they will again,” he said.

And on the subject of China, expect more scrutiny from Republican lawmakers on how to deter the world’s major power with support from both sides of the aisle, Punaro added.

“In a new Congress, I think [GOP lawmakers] are going to look at the national defense strategy and determine which parts of it they strongly support and which parts they take issue with,” he said, referring to the document recently released by the Biden administration that lists China among its greatest challenges.

“I think they’re going to ask a lot of questions about this concept of integrated deterrence and does it really deter people like Iran and China? . . . [But] you have strong bipartisan support, there is no argument there.

House Republicans already set up a China task force in early 2020, but their “Pledge to America” ​​document promises a new select committee on China.

Details on the committee are limited, but like the China task force, it is expected to address many bipartisan proposals, including working with Taiwan to supply the independent island with more US weapons as China grapples with Taipei with threats to bring it under Beijing’s control.

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Faced with cancer, you must “find your person” https://groverchamber.com/faced-with-cancer-you-must-find-your-person/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 19:00:42 +0000 https://groverchamber.com/faced-with-cancer-you-must-find-your-person/ Several years have passed since my diagnosis of breast cancer. I probably forgot more lessons he taught me than I remember, and I’m not complaining about that at all. However, the most important lesson was also the most unexpected. Cancer taught me to find your person: someone who’s been on the same journey. No one […]]]>

Several years have passed since my diagnosis of breast cancer. I probably forgot more lessons he taught me than I remember, and I’m not complaining about that at all.

However, the most important lesson was also the most unexpected. Cancer taught me to find your person: someone who’s been on the same journey. No one gave me this advice; I just stumbled upon it and found it myself, as we often do.

I was 35 years old and “the image of health”, according to my doctor. I was a runner with a healthy diet, rarely drank alcohol or caffeine… I could go on, but you know the story. Then I found a ball. Surgery, chemo, radiation and reconstruction followed. It was stage 2B.

I was lucky to have the support of my spouse, my family and my friends. I also had colleagues who were undergoing the same treatments and they unfortunately welcomed me into their club.

And yet I felt so alone. I couldn’t find anyone close to my age and in generally good health who was also a survivor. I felt like no one could understand my feeling of total betrayal by my body.

So, I went online.

The internet was very different in 2001, long before smartphones and social media. Eventually I found a breast cancer chat room and started chatting with women all over the world. They lived in the same isolation amid strong support systems. Their family and friends wanted to help, and they were helpful, but there was always something missing. The missing piece is what I was looking for.

A woman named Deborah in Melbourne, Australia asked me questions – lots of questions. As we talked, we discovered that we had a lot in common. The same type of breast cancer. Diagnosed around the same time. Born three weeks apart, the same year. Married two weeks apart, the same year. We lost our mothers in our early twenties. We kept saying, “Really? Me too!”.

At this point, the missing piece fell into place. Someone finally understood what I was going through. As our friendship grew over the next few months, someone who understood began to care about how I was living. And I was just as keen on his recovery. After all these years, I still cannot find words to describe how important this has been for my recovery. It was just…everything.

Logically, this seems to make little sense. After all, I had a loving husband who supported me in every way. He even read my breast cancer books to learn as much as he could, although he soon gave up on that endeavor because it was just too scary. No judgement, I completely understood because it was indeed scary. My friends and family called me almost every day to ask how I was doing.

I gave the answers that would shield them from the truth, because it was in my nature. Why should I tell them the real truth, who could bear to hear all this? And wouldn’t that make them even more helpless? I just couldn’t do that to them.

But I could do that to Deb. She wanted to hear the real truth. “So how’s the pain today?” she asked, “Are these drugs clogging you up too?” I swear I haven’t pooped in a month, it seems! Before I could stop laughing enough to type out a response, she snapped again, “Oh, and you fell asleep in the parking lot again after your last bombing session?”

The truth is, I never told anyone else about extreme radiation fatigue because, of course, they would worry. Because it might not be so safe to fall asleep in your car in a parking lot.

More than 20 years later, Deb still asks many questions. It became our inside joke. And finally, in 2015, we met in person. Until then, we had never even spoken on the phone. It was the first visit to New York for both of us. When we met with a long hug, it was like we’d met for coffee every week for decades, and we didn’t miss a beat.

These five days were filled with the usual tourist activities. We’ve seen a Broadway play, been to the top of Rockefeller Center, eaten at fabulous restaurants, and understandably had a lot of questions.

When my husband was dying of colon cancer in 2010, he said to me, “Please don’t wait to visit Deb in Australia. It’s been a while, life has offered ups and downs and pandemics, but next year I plan to do just that.

This post was written and submitted by Becky McCabe. The article reflects the views of Becky McCabe and not CURE®. This is also not meant to be medical advice.

For more information on cancer updates, research and education, be sure to subscribe to CURE® newsletters here.

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Johnson County Sheriff’s Office issues wanted poster https://groverchamber.com/johnson-county-sheriffs-office-issues-wanted-poster/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 19:36:21 +0000 https://groverchamber.com/johnson-county-sheriffs-office-issues-wanted-poster/ This wanted post was posted to Facebook by the Johnson County Sheriff’s Office on Wednesday. A woman featured in the poster, Emily Parrish, second from left in the top row, has already been arrested on a warrant. The Johnson County Sheriff’s Office is looking for 11 people wanted for drug trafficking or failing to appear […]]]>

This wanted post was posted to Facebook by the Johnson County Sheriff’s Office on Wednesday. A woman featured in the poster, Emily Parrish, second from left in the top row, has already been arrested on a warrant.

The Johnson County Sheriff’s Office is looking for 11 people wanted for drug trafficking or failing to appear in court.

Earlier this week, the sheriff’s office posted a poster on social media with photos of 12 people wanted on warrant, asking the public for help in locating them. A person featured in the poster, Emily Parrish, was jailed in Johnson County Jail on Tuesday.

The remaining people are still being sought.

Eight of the remaining 11 people wanted for drug trafficking were targeted in a drug bust in August. On August 8, law enforcement officers fanned out across Johnson County to arrest more than 30 people charged with narcotics.

The wanted people from the roundup featured in the poster are:

  • Jami L. Barroso, 43, of Indianapolis; methamphetamine trafficking
  • Jonathan C. Bickleman, 27, of Greenwood; two counts of methamphetamine trafficking
  • Nolan L. Brumley, 21, of Greenwood; sell a counterfeit substance
  • Derek L. Gorham, 39, of Morgantown; two counts of methamphetamine trafficking, one count of marijuana trafficking, one hash trafficking count
  • Michael S. Northcutt, 26, of Indianapolis; methamphetamine trafficking
  • Robert Shelton, 32, of New Whiteland; two counts of trafficking methamphetamine, one count of trafficking a Schedule IV controlled substance
  • Colby M. Whittemore, 24, of Greenwood; methamphetamine trafficking, paraphernalia trafficking
  • Tony A. Williams, 59, of Indianapolis; one count of methamphetamine trafficking

The other three people on the poster are wanted for failing to appear in court.

Charles Boyd, of Plainfield, was charged with trafficking methamphetamine, a felony tier 2; unlawful possession of a firearm by a serious violent criminal, a felony level 4; resist law enforcement as both a Level 6 felony and misdemeanor; and two counts of leaving the scene of an accident as a misdemeanor on April 1, 2021.

A warrant was issued for his arrest on October 12 this year after he failed to appear for a court hearing the day before, according to online court records. More information on this case was not available before the deadline.

Boyd is in the custody of Marion County law enforcement, after being arrested on new criminal charges. The new charges led to his bail being revoked and a warrant issued, according to online court records.

Jon Fox, 57, of Shelbyville, was charged on June 7, 2021 with trafficking methamphetamine, a felony tier 3; trafficking in a narcotic, a level 5 felony; and operating a motor vehicle after a lifetime license was forfeited, a Level 5 felony. In August 2020, the sheriff’s office collected evidence that he allegedly entered into two drug deals in Franklin.

On one occasion, Fox allegedly sold heroin in a Franklin Quality Inn parking lot. A few days later, Fox allegedly sold methamphetamine in a parking lot at Johnson Memorial Hospital. The deal was made within 500 feet of Custer Baker Middle School, which was in session, according to a report from the sheriff’s office.

A warrant for his arrest was issued on July 28 after he failed to appear in court. However, the judge assigned to the case – Douglas Cummins – was informed on August 31 by prison staff that the warrant had never been issued. He was later issued, according to online court records.

Corey Pickett, 33, of Indianapolis, was charged on May 17, 2021 with two counts of drug trafficking, a felony level 5. In August and September 2020, the sheriff’s office collected evidence that he reportedly made two drug deals in Greenwood.

On both occasions, Pickett allegedly sold fentanyl at a Dollar Tree in Greenwood, according to a probable cause affidavit.

A warrant was issued for his arrest on August 17, 2021 after he failed to appear in court for an initial hearing, according to online court records.

If anyone has information about anyone wanted by the Sheriff’s Office, they are encouraged to contact their local law enforcement agency and/or the Johnson County Sheriff’s Office hotline at 317-346- 4654. Tips can also be emailed to [email protected]

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Northern Territories Government turns to private security patrols as anti-social behavior rises, raising questions over police staffing https://groverchamber.com/northern-territories-government-turns-to-private-security-patrols-as-anti-social-behavior-rises-raising-questions-over-police-staffing/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 00:24:00 +0000 https://groverchamber.com/northern-territories-government-turns-to-private-security-patrols-as-anti-social-behavior-rises-raising-questions-over-police-staffing/ When Stephen Farrawell bought a house in Karama, he hoped to invest in a quiet life in the leafy northern suburbs of Darwin. Key points: The Private Security Unit patrols the Palmerston CBD and two of Darwin’s northern suburbs A government minister recently said there were not enough police officers to carry out street patrols […]]]>

When Stephen Farrawell bought a house in Karama, he hoped to invest in a quiet life in the leafy northern suburbs of Darwin.

More than two decades later, he says, alcohol-related disorders in the area have become so common that some local families are beginning to avoid public spaces altogether.

The retired civil servant leads a group of residents lobbying for government action against disorderly behavior, but he says many of them felt frontline responses were too slow.

“You never see a police car, ever,” he said.

“There are no patrols and that’s where the police have really let the community down – because their resources are prioritized elsewhere.”

In response to their concerns, the Northern Territory Government employed overnight private security patrols at a cost to the taxpayer of hundreds of thousands of dollars.

The government says the measure, known as the Public Order Response Unit, is a short-term solution while tackling the drivers of crime, not a replacement for the police.

The Northern Territory Government has deployed Public Order Response Units to problem areas.(ABC News: Jesse Thompson)

But doubts were raised after local member Ngaree Ah Kit said there were not enough police patrolling the streets, in a recent interview with ABC Radio Darwin.

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